writing…books…life…

It’s that time of the year again. Nanowrimo begins! Soo many of us are gearing up to take part. Are you?

I’m going to share here five tips to meet the furious demand of churning out words and win the coveted badge.

Before you ask, I haven’t won Nanowrimo. Not once. Well, I participated just that occasion. But I have finished 30000 in less than 15 days.  *takes a bow* Twice I’ve also managed  >40k in a month. Of course there are people out there writing more and even more speedily. What can you do to raise your word count, even when you have work and home demands which can be shelved for a short time but not totally ignored? Here are my tips for speed writing your manuscript.

Plan

For some people planning makes them feel more organised while some feel it crushes their creative freedom. However, planning at least the roughest idea of what your book is about, where do you want it to go, etc. will give you a framework of your story. You do plan what genre to write, don’t you? You also plan the location of your story, the characters’ jobs etc. At least during the initial stages of your woriting. So also plan the main dips and curves ahead. Even die hard pansters who ‘wing it’ will find it better going if they have some idea of the main pivotal points and definitely more than an idea of the characters. Their goals. Motivation. Conflict. Otherwise you might find your inkwell and your imagination well drying up before halfway through the month. Might. The advantage of planning is that you still have something to sink your teeth into in those rushed times when your muse gets sluggish. Get your characters charted out. As I mentioned in my short story tips post, one important incident at least from each of their stages of life will help you know the character better.

Choose the story you’re most excited about

What is the thing you have to talk about? The tale it’s ultra important to tell? You can only write when the subject moves you. When you’re bursting to have a go at it. Get thinking. Experience. Find what echoes with you and gets you…no, zings you right into the story world.
If possible write 20-25 pages beforehand. That gives you an idea where you should start the story. I don’t think it’s cheating 🙂 Write them then bury them in some other folder. Start afresh on first November.

Ignore the internal editor

This is self explanatory. It’s very, very easy to get caught in the fatal embrace of internal editor. So it’s crucial that you don’t start with the revision process while you’re writing. This happened to me when I first joined Nano. I went back and read what I wrote and tweaked and tweaked some more…and then I didn’t like this…didn’t like that…it went on and that story is still only 15 pages done 😦 So ignore the temptation to make it ‘just’ a little better. December is waiting to get all that done.

Don’t expect all days to be fruitful

Certain days are bound to be better. I’d write 4k one day then sink to 350 the next. Don’t fret about it. Go catch a movie or read a book. Some days are unproductive; you just can’t help it. But indulging ‘off days’ might be just a case of allowing your imagination the lubricant oil of rest. Once the mind settles, ideas start to filter back. Look out for my upcoming post on writers’ block on how to nurse your creativity back to health. 🙂

Don’t mull on it all the day

You’ll get bored if you keeping things of nothing but your WIP all your waking and sleeping hours. Ultimately, you might start to hate it. It begins to seem like work, instead of fun which it started out being. The moment you get up from in front of the keyboard, try not to go back over what you’ve written. If something brilliant comes to mind, make a note. But don’t go over and over a problem again. If you’ve run into a figurative brick wall, go out and do things in between. Fill your muse with inspiration. Most of us rehash, because when you get a load of writing done, it seems like the most exciting thing in the world but take it from one who did it too many times. Thinking too much about it, spoils your story. Yes, it is the antithesis of my previous planning advice but still it has to be said. Plan what your next scene is going to be within an hour or two of your next writing session. Not before.

Of course all advice in writing varies from individual to individual in its usefulness but these are the general tips to keep you on track. A bonus piece of advice. Don’t limit your writing to your official writing time. Carry your current chapter on your phone, notebook, paper napkin ;)…anything which works for you! In those moments when you have to wait for food to cook, travel somewhere, in the waiting rooms, during lunch break at office…seize the opportunity and scribble. That’s a covert and effective way of building word count. 200 words short sessions pile up into big ones and you get that feeling of achievement which is a spur to do more and more!

Good luck to all Nanowrimo participants all over the world. Go make your manuscript happen.

Did you find these tips worth pursuing? What are your own speed writing secrets? Have you ever won Nano? What most helped you make it? Do share your views.

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Comments on: "Five tips for Nanowrimo success" (5)

  1. A neat article! I’ve tried and failed twice earlier, and I can see that I had fallen victim to some of the things you talk about! Hopefully, this year will be better if I actually heed all this good advice!

  2. Thank you, Meera. So happy you found this helpful. Good luck for this year! 🙂

  3. Ah, indeed possible to fall for the traps that you’ve mentioned above. It’d really be helpful to keep these in my mind as I attempt my first wrimo. 😉

  4. I am thinking about it … only thinking mind. It would be nice though … Damn it, I doin’ it!

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